Monday, 19 September 2016

OSC Event - Open Evening - Draconids meteor shower on 7th October 2016

October 7, 2016, the Draconids
The radiant point for the Draconid meteor shower almost coincides with the head of the constellation Draco the Dragon in the northern sky. That’s why the Draconids are best viewed from the Northern Hemisphere. The Draconid shower is a real oddity, in that the radiant point stands highest in the sky as darkness falls. That means that, unlike many meteor showers, more Draconids are likely to fly in the evening hours than in the morning hours after midnight. This shower is usually a sleeper, producing only a handful of languid meteors per hour in most years. But watch out if the Dragon awakes! In rare instances, fiery Draco has been known to spew forth many hundreds of meteors in a single hour. In 2016, the waxing crescent moon may somewhat intrude on this year’s Draconid shower. Try watching at nightfall and early evening on October 7.
 The Wealden Astronomical Society will also be on hand with their telescopes on the lawn. (Viewing is subject to weather permitting.)

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